Thought about a career in racing?

If you want to work with horses, there has never been a better time to join the horseracing industry. Careersinracing which is run by the British Horseracing Authority (BHA) promotes jobs, training and apprenticeships in the horseracing industry. British Racing is the UK’s second most popular spectator sport after football and is the largest sporting employer.

There are several different opportunities available with a wide range of training courses from Apprenticeships to an MBA. We have three dedicated training providers offering courses at all levels, riding and non-riding.

  • The British Racing School
  • National Horseracing College
  • The National Stud.

With results day now here the options of what to do next is on many minds. Whatever your exam results you have all kinds of options available for you to pick from. Below are a couple of options available for yourself and with some case studies to help.

Type – Apprenticeship – Apprenticeship in Racehorse Care (Riding option) with British Racing School, Location – Nationwide

The British Racing School delivers the Foundation Apprenticeship completely free and you are guaranteed a job in racing. The course is suitable for all abilities, even if you are a complete beginner; all you need to do is to show that you are keen to work in racing and willing to learn. The course is compulsory for anyone under 19 entering the racing industry.

You’ll learn a host of skills specifically related to the care of racehorses and how to ride them. You will need to like working outdoors, have a reasonable level of fitness and be hardworking.

The course will include:

  • A residential Foundation Course
  • A work placement in a racing yard
  • Key skills development

The Foundation element of the course will last 9-12 weeks and if you complete your studies successfully, the next step is a placement in a yard to work your apprenticeship. The apprenticeship usually takes between 10-12 months to achieve.  During this time, you’ll be judged on a series of assessments made at the yard you’re working in.

For further information visit  www.brs.org.uk

Type – Apprenticeship – Apprenticeship in Racehorse Care (Riding option) with National Horseracing College, Location – Nationwide

The National Horseracing College delivers the Foundation Apprenticeship completely free and you are guaranteed a job in racing. The course is suitable for all abilities, even if you are a complete beginner; all you need to do is to show that you are keen to work in racing and willing to learn. The aim of this twelve-week residential course is to prepare students for work in the racing industry. During this initial period of training students will undertake such activities as carrying out yard duties, looking after racehorses, riding out, attending lectures and studying for their technical certificate and key skills qualifications.

The course will include:

  • An NVQ Level 1 in Introductory Racehorse Care
  • Key Skills Qualifications
  • First Aid Certificate

For more information visit  https://www.thenhc.co.uk/

Where Does the Course Lead?
  • Upon successful completion of the foundation course, suitable students with the right aptitude will be found employment in a UK racing stables
  • Apprenticeship qualification including an NVQ Level 2 in Racehorse Care
  • The chance to progress to positions of responsibility
  • For people of the right size and ability, the chance to become a jockey

For more information visit  https://www.thenhc.co.uk/

Type – Apprenticeship – Apprenticeship in Racehorse Care (Breeding option) with the National Stud, Location – Nationwide

If you have decided that you want to work with horses but that you don’t necessarily want to ride, then think about training for a career in the breeding industry. The training is open to anyone and is free to all EU citizens aged between 18 and 25 at the National Stud in Newmarket. You won’t need any formal qualifications, but you will need to love animals and love being outdoors and not afraid of hard work.

For more information visit www.nationalstud.co.uk

The Graduate Development Programme

The Graduate Development Programme is also another path to think about after results day. The British Horseracing Graduate Development Programme, which has been running for over 25 years, provides an invaluable source of talent to the sport and its supporting industry. Over 400 graduates have completed the programme and the majority have established careers in horseracing in a wide range of roles; management positions at racecourses, bookmakers, the trade press, trainer’s yards, studs, bloodstock sales and at the British Horseracing Authority.

The programme is intended for degree students in their final year of university or those who have recently graduated. Applications are welcomed from all backgrounds and experience.  Will start with a comprehensive two- week residential course held at The British Racing School (BRS) in Newmarket in July, which includes a wide range of speakers, field trips, personal development and networking opportunities. All graduates stay in accommodation at the BRS for the duration of the two-week course.

Graduates then go on to their paid placements which are usually eight weeks in some cases may be longer.

For more information: https://www.careersinracing.com/course/graduate-programme/

Some Mythbusters in Racing!
I am too tall to work in racing

There is no height limit for riding racehorses, to ride racehorses there is a weight limit for the welfare of the racehorses but height is unrestricted.

You have to be able to ride a horse to work in racing

Whilst having previous riding experience is beneficial, it is by no means essential. Many apprenticeship students have no riding or horse handling experience as all of this is taught during the apprenticeship. There are also many other jobs in the racing industry which are office based, so no horse handling or riding skills are required.

Working in horseracing offers limited career progression

The horseracing industry offers a wide variety of job roles at varying levels, there are entry points for apprentices and graduates as well as a postgraduate MBA degree.

I don't want to be a jockey, so working in racing is not for me

There are such a variety of careers on offer in the horseracing industry that there really is something for everyone. There are both practical roles working directly with horses and commercial/business roles at racecourses and racing authorities.

Working with horses is poorly paid

Horseracing is the only equestrian discipline to have a wage agreement in place for Stable Staff. Other benefits include a pension scheme, RIABS insurance and pool money.

About The Author

The British Horseracing Authority’s Careers in Racing team implement recruitment, training, education and community initiatives for the horseracing industry. Racing is a great place to work!

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